Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
decaflol

Critique some Portraits

Recommended Posts

decaflol    490

I've been working on some portraits lately.

2mm8zt4.jpg

This is of Angelina Jolie. I liked the shading on it, it was faint but not overbearing.

346apad.jpg

Some random woman (with huge knockers) ie not based on anyone in particular. Just what came to my mind during class (as you might see it's drawn on lined paper). It has really dark shading, but I think the values came out well.

2rmqf5j.jpg

Billy Mays. Not one of my best but it looked alright.

11so8id.jpg

Wilford Brimley. Also alright, but I can't seem to get eyelashes to work on males often without looking effeminate, so that's something I need to work on.

What is everyone's opinions on these, if you don't mind asking?

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
decaflol    490

i like the billy mays one

boobs line on angelina should be lower. fix the teeth and the skin under the nose.

Thanks for the input, I'll try that. On the teeth though, it's not like I never draw teeth, but most of my portraits have closed mouths (I am just noticing this right now). I should probably practice them more.

On the Billy Mays one, it's not even so much that I think it's poorly drawn that it doesn't fully resemble him (I'm not even sure if there's a way to capture Billy Mays very well). Like if someone told you it was Billy Mays, you could see the resemblance, but if not he just looks like some guy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zombie Kitty    53

I'm not a fan of the smudge shading method by any means. It tends to make a piece look dirty and fingered up if not taken good care. However you seem to control your smudging very well, you give a nice contrast while keeping it clean. Well done. :]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
godframe    189

A few things:

- You should try working on the tonal fields a lot more, distinguish the darks and lights. Trust me, contrast is the key to a good portrait. And yeah, don't smudge the marks to blend... just work the graphite really softly and create a gradation that way.

- The above would be a hell of a lot easier if you had access to different pencils (i.e. 8B for the darks)

- For the hair, block in solid chunks instead of defining every individual hair (this applies to facial hair as well). When you try doing every strand it ends up looking wispy as fuck, even if the person you're drawing has hair like a goddamn wild man. Second one looks better than the others for this, but the hair doesn't have to be two-toned for it to look good.

- On the eyes, try to make it a little murky, but then make them come alive with dark irises and a little highlight of white across the eye. It comes with practice, don't know how to describe it very well to be honest.

- Try working the ground (background) to give them a little presence, right now they're just kind of floating in space and it's distracting. Even just a grey background can work if the portrait is detailed enough.

Not trying to be a dick by showing you up or anything, but if you look at the below portrait (assignment I did for a drawing class, took roughly 8 hours) you can see a lot of the elements I highlighted above being implemented.

EditedGalleryShotCoolBestCropped.jpg

I get that these are just like quick studies, but you can get a lot of realism quickly just by doing a few of those things I mentioned, doesn't have to be blended very well like a finished drawing.

Hope this helped, good luck art'ing, bro.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
┬╗PJ    4183

PJ approves of the advice posted above, more contrast = better. Also, invest in some 2B, 4B and 6B pencils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
decaflol    490

Thanks again for the input, and yeah I appreciate the help. No big deal, after all this thread is about critique.

As for the 2B, 4B, and 6B pencils, I believe I used a 4B for them. More contrast would be nice so I'd invest in that, in general these portraits were just done during school though. Not to say I didn't try on them at all, just that they aren't by any means "masterpieces".

I might try another sometime soon with some of the advice given and some more contrast and different pencils to experiment at least.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey man. I'm an art student doing the advanced subsidiary Cambridge course and I can give you a couple of tips.

I'll try not to repeat anything that's already been said

Your drawings look very articulate and precise in the sense that I can imagine you with your tongue out drawing all these lines carefully. Be more free with your lines and do some trial and error, I mean, that's what an eraser's for right?

Another thing is that perhaps you need to look at some character models, your eyelashes are basically the same length, same spacing, same shape. Looks very unnatural sorry to say. If you observe people irl or even yourself, it'll look much better and more real. Like when im drawing portraits out of my head and can't get the hand right, I just make my hand into the shape of what I'm trying to draw and it's much easier.

I know it's been said but contrast is key. Perhaps the hair has some highlights where the light has shone. You can fade in and out via the rest of the hair but if the hair meets the face, you should darken up the meeting point/line.

I rushed this on my iPod so excuse me for any English mistakes but yeah. Practice more. Get some character models. I personally use Daniel gerhartz for my oil painting, a little of da Vinci for my sketches, and some Lucian Freud for more expressive stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Slowpoke    1377

a nice tip is as you draw more portraits, try moving away from heavy outlines and draw things by using shadows. hope that helps :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×