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Shaman

Which type of engineering should I major in?

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Shaman    531

I'm starting college next fall but still undecided on my major, I know I want to go in a math/physics/maybe computer direction but I'm not sure which. I also heard computer engineering and computer science is getting outsourced but I'm not sure how much truth that holds. Which field of engineering has the best future and job prospects in the coming years?

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»victor    6400

I'm starting college next fall but still undecided on my major, I know I want to go in a math/physics/maybe computer direction but I'm not sure which. I also heard computer engineering and computer science is getting outsourced but I'm not sure how much truth that holds. Which field of engineering has the best future and job prospects in the coming years?

The field of computer science has the best future and job prospects in the coming years.

Even today, the companies that are thriving in this dismal economy are those in the tech industry. Namely, Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook ("The Gang of Four").

And moreover, fields within computer science such as computer security, cloud computing, data mining, etc. are the future. You need to be able to handle and process large amounts of data in a safe and secure fashion.

And as the mobile computing revolution (smartphones, tablets, etc.) continues, making natural interfaces and more power efficient, speedy browsers/processors/etc. is very important.

All this only goes to show that the tech industry is live and well in years ahead.

And as long as you have the right skillset, there is little fear of being outsourced. In my mind, the media is wrongly conflating the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs and the death of Motor City, suffering in Ohio, Pennsylvania with the happenings in the tech industry. By and large, only the "menial" tech jobs are being outsourced (testing, integration, maintenance, etc.) and much of the actual research/implementation occurs in the United States (in Seattle, Silicon Valley, Research Triangle Park, etc.).

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All of the old infrastructure in the United States is falling apart. We are going to need a lot of mechanical engineers to keep up with the surge of infrastructure failings due to occur.

Demand will go way up in the next twenty years.

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»victor    6400

All of the old infrastructure in the United States is falling apart. We are going to need a lot of mechanical engineers to keep up with the surge of infrastructure failings due to occur.

Demand will go way up in the next twenty years.

I concur with this, with the caveat that obstructionist Republicans in Congress may only pass watered down pieces of "stimulus" legislation for infrastructure.

Their ideological stands on austerity, cutting the deficit, not raising taxes, etc. is really getting in the way of crafting effective policy that could create jobs and get people back to work.

Companies like Apple are much more likely to thrive amidst divided government, partisan discord.

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Jesus the Jew    986

Honestly, almost all of them are extremely viable and will likely land you a good job if you're good at it. Nano is probably less likely to be a good choice in the near future since the technology is still in early development (unless you plan to be a researcher).

I'm a Mech E, which is the broadest of the engineering fields. So, if you're somewhat indecisive on what to choose it's a good field.

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All of the old infrastructure in the United States is falling apart. We are going to need a lot of mechanical engineers to keep up with the surge of infrastructure failings due to occur.

Demand will go way up in the next twenty years.

I concur with this, with the caveat that obstructionist Republicans in Congress may only pass watered down pieces of "stimulus" legislation for infrastructure.

Their ideological stands on austerity, cutting the deficit, not raising taxes, etc. is really getting in the way of crafting effective policy that could create jobs and get people back to work.

Companies like Apple are much more likely to thrive amidst divided government, partisan discord.

I think a lot of infrastructure jobs are funded at the state level. I don't think we would have the federal government paying to repair NYCs aqueducts and reservoir system.

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»victor    6400

I think a lot of infrastructure jobs are funded at the state level. I don't think we would have the federal government paying to repair NYCs aqueducts and reservoir system.

While that is true, it is also true that the federal government is responsible for interstate commerce. So to fix those bridges, roads, highways, money from the federal government is required.

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All of the old infrastructure in the United States is falling apart. We are going to need a lot of mechanical engineers to keep up with the surge of infrastructure failings due to occur.

Demand will go way up in the next twenty years.

I concur with this, with the caveat that obstructionist Republicans in Congress may only pass watered down pieces of "stimulus" legislation for infrastructure.

Their ideological stands on austerity, cutting the deficit, not raising taxes, etc. is really getting in the way of crafting effective policy that could create jobs and get people back to work.

Companies like Apple are much more likely to thrive amidst divided government, partisan discord.

agree, although there's some encouraging news to share. even recently obama is finding some unlikely allies among their ranks with his new proposals for infrastructure spending. as the condition deteriorates even the "intransigent" republicans will have many reasons to change their tune. however much one might claim to be "fiscally conservative" he'll get a ton of hometown support when he gets funding for their new roads.

[edit] as for the original topic i think electrical is underrated. sure there's a lot of computer stuff going on now in the U.S. but it can be outsourced more easily than EE expertise. hardware has long-term staying power and will be growing.

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Thanatos    516

if ur really unsure, just go in undeclared and take the basic classes everyone has to take like chem, physics, calc etc. if not, pick w/e then switch if u want.

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I personally was in the same spot as you over the summer. I wanted to be an engineer but didnt know what kind. So I went in undeclared in the Purdue School of Engineering and found out that I wanted to be on the business aspect of it. So I am now a double major in English Rhetoric and Composition and Multidisiplinary engineering.

My point is you dont have to know what you want to do now, you have plenty of time to decide man.

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Twitter    2057

how much money do you want to make long-term / how dedicated can you be to school / where are you going to school

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+rei+    34657

Systems engineering - its hard but you make crazy money

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Shaman    531

I thought civil engineers were the ones who worked on infrastructure?

how much money do you want to make long-term / how dedicated can you be to school / where are you going to school

50k - 100k / School would be my top priority /

Also, any thoughts on Aerospace?

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Twitter    2057

i think he's just referring to them differently.

if thats what you want to make starting, then aerospace would be the best bet i suppose. without a masters you start at 60k, and with one you start at around 100k i think.

im still in highschool, but im planning on jumping into civil engineering

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+rei+    34657

Again, Systems.

90 k a year early

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Shaman    531

Wow so as an update I finished my B.S. in Computer Engineering and am now working as a Software Engineer. I buy some cryptocurrency every week and luckily I got in shortly before the pump this year. I hope to one day make enough money holding and trading crypto to travel the world and hang around bad bitches.

 

I wouldn't recommend Mechanical or Electrical to anybody because unless you make some breakthrough in the field that is a fast track to working 40 hours for somebody else your entire life.

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+scuzzlebutt    23495

LOL

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+Urthor    10225

I know about 4 people who studied mechatronic engineering and finished at different points over the past three years.  Two are literally working in IT, one is working in an unrelated position at a small firm after the owners didn't give a shit and hired him when they could have/should have gotten someone who actually knew something about putting walls that don't fall down because he's a nice guy and deserves it, and the 4th was stacking shelves as of 14 months ago hopefully onto something better right now.  

 

Basically yeah traditional engineering on its way to being up there with medicine as just not worth the trouble in this job market.  

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turceal    29

I graduated from Comp Eng April 16 and i know tons of places looking for engineers. The company i currently work at had issues with finding enough engineers to hire for even basic contract positions. 

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