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Chief    332

I've been wanting to self- learn some kind of language and was wondering what's a good way to break into this? What should I learn, what should I do to start?

I remember someone posted a self learn link on here before but I can't find it. Any help is appreaciated.

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kingkhaled    13

Learn Visual Basic first if you have no grasp of fundamental programming. You could tinker with HTML as well even though technically it isn't a programming language.

 

 

Once you gain a bit of a fundamental understanding of programming I'd advise you to learn Python. It is a great high-level language for beginners. Once you finish with that go ahead and try to learn C++ and Java. 

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Chaos Ray    5

C++ and Java are both fairly simple languages to learn are are really similar in the syntax. However Python is also pretty easy language to learn and also does have a few luxuries the other 2 do not offer.

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+rei+    34516

Learn Visual Basic first if you have no grasp of fundamental programming. You could tinker with HTML as well even though technically it isn't a programming language.

Never, ever, ever, ever post here again. Seriously you have NO idea what the fuck you're talking about. Visual Basic is the WORST way to learn how to program. 

 

Seriously stay the fuck out of my section.

 

 

 

 

Anyway I tend to lead with Python first not because of its individual merits just because Python has a very good resource to learn how to code in general

http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/ 

Java is also a safe bet; I'm not a fan of diving into C++ right away as there's a ton of 'oddities' in the language that are a mess later. 

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Chief    332

Thanks chaos ray. 

Thanks rei. I didn't know where to start so I found and started c++, but I'm literally at just introductions so I'll stop and start python instead.

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+rei+    34516

its not like you hurt yourself doing C++ so if you think its cool dont necessarily stop

 

The reason I personally badmouth C++ is twofold:

 

1: Different programming languages operate on different "paradigms" - that is to say 'think of the structure of your code in the following way' - C++ is ostensibly an Object-Oriented language (invisioning all software components as independant objects to be implemented in the 1000 yard view perspective - Java and Python are both also Object Oriented, and as my background is primarily Java, Python and C# its the way I think about code now), however its implementation tends to harken back to C's functional routes so organizationally its kind of backassward

2: C++ features memory management, no real string implementation, and other 'fun' low level stuff that is more likely to frustrate and get in the way than make you a good coder early. It's really a perfect third or so language to learn once you're ready to tackle more advanced concepts like pointers and memory allocation 

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+rei+    34516
it was super trendy a few years ago; iirc a lot of Digg's backend was on it? I might be wrong though; it was what everyone was talking about in my first two years of university.

Syntactically it looks simple (which is good and one of the reasons I like python), it certainly has application (not sure what the job market is but it certainly has a role in web dev), and ruby is also the scripting language for RPG maker so if you want to be super hardcore with that...

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+rei+    34516
Business development: Java, C#
Good to know for other techy jobs like sysadmin work: Perl, Python
Web: PHP, Ruby on Rails, ADO.NET (which is basically web implementation of any .NET tech, so I use C# with it but you can easily use C++.NET or VB.NET for it), JSP (which is Java Server Pages so, java)
Gaming / low level: C, C++, C# (XBLA only), though Unity can use Java or C# or C++

That said learn one paradigm and learning a new language of the same paradigm is easy. (Python, Java, C# and technically C++ all are the same paradigm)
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»victor    6400

rei is basically reiterating points I've made in a couple other threads.

 

Web languages like RoR are a niche job, only knowing Web be relegated to doing front-end work, making things look nice and user-friendly, not backend logic. If you really needed to, you could just Google documentation/tutorials and copy/paste and modify boilerplate code on the Web to do what you need to do.

 

Web languages don't translate over, if you don't know how to use data structures (especially lists and hashtables/maps/dictionaries), parse files, things like that, you are really limited as a programmer.

 

C# (and I suppose .NET) is restricted to Microsoft and Windows, so that limits you. But it's a lot like Java, so you can pick it up easily if you need to.

 

If you were going to learn programming, I'd recommend know Java well, know Python for scripting,  and know about pointers, memory management (i.e. know C or C++).

 

TLDR: If you are confident with C/C++/Java and can do Python scripts, you are pretty much set.

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+rei+    34516

I actually found web coding a more complex and challenging skillset but maybe thats because i've understood basic data structures for so long and learned web comparatively recently. 

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+rei+    34516

also this is a pretty blanket statement but stop getting all hot and bothered about what language you know and actually start coding 

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PsyKnz    195

I know this thread is a couple weeks old now but I'd just like to say I'd also recommend Java as a starting point. Mostly it'll teach you good coding practices, the language is very straight forward to use and it's very well supported by the developer. You have the potential to go very deep with it but also to output great looking and easy to interact with software from a very early point in learning the language. They basically hide all of the very complex concepts in programming from you (like memory management) without taking control of it away from you.

 

If you can get grounded in Java, you can probably pick up pretty much anything after that without too much additional effort.

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+rei+    34516

Worth noting at least in C#, not sure about java, if you WANT to go low level with mem management and shit, you can. 

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Nish    253

I started learning programming with vb and it's a terrible language, when I started studying Computer Science at Uni they used Python as their beginning language and transitioned to Java/C++ in the 2nd/third years. Atm working with c# and i'd probably recommend either that or Python, those were the 2 languages that I found most enjoyable to code in.

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SparkyFlary    19

I can recommend you some books and tutorials I read and heard were good. Try the CodeLite and Eclipse for C/C++ and Java.

 

C Programming A Modern Approach 2nd Ed

C++ Primer, 5th Ed

Clean Code by Robert Martin

Data Structures and Problem Solving Using Java 4th Edition - Mark Allen Weiss

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reallybigindex.html

http://docs.python.org/3.3/tutorial/

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»Starwind    1777

what do you guys think of ruby on rails?

Ruby on Rails is not a programming language, it's a framework built on top of Ruby for building web applications. With that said, I love Ruby. 

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»Starwind    1777

rei is basically reiterating points I've made in a couple other threads.

 

Web languages like RoR are a niche job, only knowing Web be relegated to doing front-end work, making things look nice and user-friendly, not backend logic. If you really needed to, you could just Google documentation/tutorials and copy/paste and modify boilerplate code on the Web to do what you need to do.

 

Web languages don't translate over, if you don't know how to use data structures (especially lists and hashtables/maps/dictionaries), parse files, things like that, you are really limited as a programmer.

 

C# (and I suppose .NET) is restricted to Microsoft and Windows, so that limits you. But it's a lot like Java, so you can pick it up easily if you need to.

 

If you were going to learn programming, I'd recommend know Java well, know Python for scripting,  and know about pointers, memory management (i.e. know C or C++).

 

TLDR: If you are confident with C/C++/Java and can do Python scripts, you are pretty much set.

You are wrong about Ruby on Rails. It is a full-stack framework. Ruby is not a "web language." What does that even mean anyway?

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»victor    6400

My mistake about Ruby on Rails, I know what you mean. It's more comparable to Python and Django.

 

Ruby is also used for scripting, like Perl and Python.

 

RoR in that sentence could be replaced by HTML/CSS/Javascript, what you think of when you think of web, and the sentiment expressed in that post would be the same.

 

You don't want to pigeonhole yourself to just the web as a first or initial language, that was the larger point I was trying to make.

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