Jump to content
ensane

Feeling very behind

Recommended Posts

ensane    163

I've been interested in working in a computer field since I was little (I'm 21 now), but I feel like I don't have enough of a skill set to really do anything, even low level; problem being I don't know where to go next or what to go into per se.

 

What I know now:

Basic knowledge basically anyone with above average familiarity in computers know

High school C++ - went from integers to multidimensional arrays

High school Java - from intergers again to classes + gridworld

CPE 1 - basically C++ again from integers to classes/structs

CPE 2 - failed due to minor depressive spike. Only really got up to higher i/o manipulations and binary trees :/

 

(Everything above was ~2+ years ago. I've forgotten alot, but I wouldn't really have any problems relearning anything I need to)

 

After that came some military training; I entered the national guard with a information systems MOS which included:

Identifying hardware, troubleshooting hardware issues - ram, hdd, etc

Crash course on A+

Installing xp, vista, 7, server 2008, outlook

Low level CISCO stuff. Not sure how it compares to legit CISCO. - basic router commands, subnetting, basic switch commands

Crash course on Sec+ - I also got my actual Sec+ cert somehow during this time (paid out of pocket >_>) but I'm not really that confident in it

Some army-specific stuff

Some higher level army-specific stuff

 

(All the courses were 3 weeks or so to give some scope. 2 each of A+ and CISCO)

 

 

I'm currently going to generic community college - at a rate of 1 class/semester because monies - for a 2 year CIS degree with networking option. Decided that over the programming option at random since I can switch until a certain point. I started out trying to focus on programming but I kinda liked the networking stuff, too...

 

More specific questions:

Does anyone know the pros and cons of programming vs networking? Or perhaps the differences between the two? Money isn't that important to me beyond 60k for the long term in a field.

What sort of things should I know that I don't? I don't know if I should go and learn python or SQL or relearn C++/Java for example.

Should I attempt to keep up my Sec+ cert and/or try to get another one? It took a lot for me to get, in both time and money, but so far it hasn't seemed very useful to me.

Finally, am I too far behind to catch up at all? I currently work stocking at walmart, I could just try to climb that T_T

 

I don't think I've really contributed to the site that substantially, but I'd greatly appreciate any feedback on this if possible.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
»lo fi    2611

I've been interested in working in a computer field since I was little (I'm 21 now), but I feel like I don't have enough of a skill set to really do anything, even low level; problem being I don't know where to go next or what to go into per se.

 

What I know now:

Basic knowledge basically anyone with above average familiarity in computers know

High school C++ - went from integers to multidimensional arrays

High school Java - from intergers again to classes + gridworld

CPE 1 - basically C++ again from integers to classes/structs

CPE 2 - failed due to minor depressive spike. Only really got up to higher i/o manipulations and binary trees :/

 

(Everything above was ~2+ years ago. I've forgotten alot, but I wouldn't really have any problems relearning anything I need to)

 

After that came some military training; I entered the national guard with a information systems MOS which included:

Identifying hardware, troubleshooting hardware issues - ram, hdd, etc

Crash course on A+

Installing xp, vista, 7, server 2008, outlook

Low level CISCO stuff. Not sure how it compares to legit CISCO. - basic router commands, subnetting, basic switch commands

Crash course on Sec+ - I also got my actual Sec+ cert somehow during this time (paid out of pocket >_>) but I'm not really that confident in it

Some army-specific stuff

Some higher level army-specific stuff

 

(All the courses were 3 weeks or so to give some scope. 2 each of A+ and CISCO)

 

 

I'm currently going to generic community college - at a rate of 1 class/semester because monies - for a 2 year CIS degree with networking option. Decided that over the programming option at random since I can switch until a certain point. I started out trying to focus on programming but I kinda liked the networking stuff, too...

 

More specific questions:

Does anyone know the pros and cons of programming vs networking? Or perhaps the differences between the two? Money isn't that important to me beyond 60k for the long term in a field.

What sort of things should I know that I don't? I don't know if I should go and learn python or SQL or relearn C++/Java for example.

Should I attempt to keep up my Sec+ cert and/or try to get another one? It took a lot for me to get, in both time and money, but so far it hasn't seemed very useful to me.

Finally, am I too far behind to catch up at all? I currently work stocking at walmart, I could just try to climb that T_T

 

I don't think I've really contributed to the site that substantially, but I'd greatly appreciate any feedback on this if possible.



Alright, I'm going to give you the advice that will make you a lot more marketable at least in the eyes of an interviewer. Primarily because, I'm in the raft looking around for jobs, because I'm a fucking bum right now, and I finally decided I wanted to do I.T Work.

Once I land this contract, me and ash will be participating in the "Who's contract is it anyway?"

So..CISCO skills are extremely marketable, migrational skills are extremely marketable, being able to upgrade a system from 7 to 8 is fairly easy, and it's what they like to hear. As a Network Engineer, you also need to be competent on those levels, even if it's something that seems so basic. Take the basic CISCO structural course work and develop the tools to get your CCNA. Then proceed to get your CCNA(ahue), Try working on getting your annual Network + If you cannot get your CCNA ( The test is kind of hard, well I suck at subnetting so it's like.. The worst) Sec + Is a fine entry level position it means you understand the basic means, and motives of security in the industry level nothing too fancy schmancy.

As for the SQL / Programming side of it.

SQL / Oracle / Java ( the rest of the world of programming) Are extremely important, knowing these languages opens up a door way for you in the sense that it completely makes you marketable more than most. If you are able to write strong, efficient, code, or be able to navigate a Database, and or create / migrate / the works you are way set.

Learning SQL / Oracle takes about as much time to learn Java efficiently, although it bumps the paygrade significantly. 

DBA's will make more than Network Engineers depending on the company, and how long they've been in the field as well if they're considered a 'senior'

Network Admins and DBA's will do the same amount of work, and get paid about the same. 

Sec+ Is useful in the sense of just a pretty name to add on your resume, but it's not going to do much for you in the field unless you're trying to do Security ( Which, security makes a bunch of money if you land it with the right firm).

TL:DR

[spoiler] 

Security = I make one vulnerability, and i file papers for 2 years about it.

Networking = " Well, this was interesting for the first five seconds I walked on the site today.. It's time to just patch, finish the migration. I'ma kick my feet on the table, and let the level 2 /3 tech's do the rest of the work"

DBA = " My name is Ash." ( I can't really answer what he does in a day, never walked in his shoes) 

[/spoiler]

I.T is never too late to learn, it's an ever growing field, and you should learn everything you can, and present that, make it absolutely your goal to absorb everything.. And that's what will set you apart from the rest.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AL13    13

To summarize my experience on the IT proffesional world, since high school I started to like and try to follow networking, even took Cisco CCNA and even began to pursue the CCNP and Cisco Security course. Then after finishing my degree, I've tried to get on Cisco or other companies that work with their stuff...this took like 3 or 4 months, until I gave up and started as soon as possible my career as a SDE, forgetting about what I liked the most, which was networking. Took 2 or 3 bumps on "low rated" companies, until I arrived at MS and I'm staying here for a while now or I hope so. So far I don't regret any of my decisions and I'm learning and improving so much that its hard to measure.

 

With this I can really tell you to pursue a carreer as soon as possible because you will get more leverage in the market if you have experience with actual work and not with "more study". If you have to begin in a small company, go for it, but keep your mind open on getting new jobs until you get the right one. Is hard to say if I would be better working on networking full time, but that would mean I would have to be trying a good job at it for even more then the 4 months that it took to me to change ideas. 

 

TL:DR

- If you actually hate other computer fields, then my advice is to continue to try until you actually get one job at it and I advise Cisco courses for networking...actually think that it is the best by a long margin.

 

- If not, believe me if you begin your career early and stay pro-active, you'll be at a great rythim to get what you like the most on the IT world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+rei+    34354
learning 'oracle / sql' is a lot more learning how the software works than how to deveop for it - DBA roles are exactly that - administration; honestly jump towards what kind of work you find easiest or enjoy most 60k is easy in most fields

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ensane    163

I see, thank you for the responses. One thing I forgot to ask is what kind of low level jobs would help? I've heard things like Geek Squad and Dell Technician aren't such good things to go for. I don't really know anything about help desks either...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
»Paxman    4776
Freshen up your skill set. Junior programmer, web dev, and helpdesk are the easier in jobs.

Alternatively you can follow a career path similar to mine. I'm in IT project management (graduated with a major in networking). It's less hands on technical more working with IT infrastructure, systems and interconnectivity with businesses. Of course I plan to be management at some point in IT, which was always my goal, so it all depends on what you think you want to do in the long term. Figure out what you like about IT first and go from there.
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×