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+ACP+    33889

Applications of No Limit Hold 'Em: A Guide to Understanding Theoretical Sound Poker by Matthew Jinda (2013)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdamhvVXI5Y2NwcFk/view?usp=sharing

Crushing the Microstakes by Nathan "Blackrain79" Williams (2011)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdclBHYVRMb2ZmQzA/view?usp=sharing

Don't Listen to Phil Hellmuth: Correcting the 50 Worst Pieces of Poker Advice You've Ever Heard by Dusty Schmidt and Paul Christopher Hoppe (2010)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdcEk0cW1uSTdMd1E/view?usp=sharing

Dynamic Full Ring Poker: Beyond the Basics by James "Splitsuit" Sweeney (2010)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdNVhBZUI0N002OHM/view?usp=sharing

Easy Game: Making Sense of No-Limit Hold 'Em (Volume I) by Andrew "Balugawhale" Seidman (2009)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdNFlFYjhlTmE0UjA/view?usp=sharing

Easy Game: Making Sense of No-Limit Hold 'Em (Volume II) by Andrew "Balugawhale" Seidman (2009)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdT2tNWlQyVDFXSFE/view?usp=sharing

Easy Game: Making Sense of No-Limit Hold 'Em (Volume III) by Andrew "Balugawhale" Seidman (2011)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQda1RIUVlIM25kSDQ/view?usp=sharing

Ed Miller Miscellaneous Strategy Columns by Ed Miller (2007-2008)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdVmREYlN3dWhZVmc/view?usp=sharing

Elements of Poker by Tommy Angelo (2007)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdeDlJNDk1dEFpQXc/view?usp=sharing

Harrington on Hold 'Em: Volume I: Strategic Play by Dan Harrington (2004)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdN0U1RmwtM1RwSHM/view?usp=sharing

Harrington on Hold 'Em: Volume II: The Endgame by Dan Harrington (2005):https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdV1RDUF81aWpCSkk/view?usp=sharing

Harrington on Hold 'Em: Volume III: The Workbook by Dan Harrington (2006)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdYzJTenYxdjAxZnc/view?usp=sharing

Let There Be Range by Tri "Slowhabit" Nguyen and Cole "CTS" South (2008)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdX1RiZW5yMnEta2c/view?usp=sharing

The Mathematics of Poker by Bill Chen and Jerrod Ankenman (2006)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdR2c1M3E4MlFwMTA/view?usp=sharing

The Mental Game of Poker by Jared Tendler (2011)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdYTB6YUNfMm1OTXc/view?usp=sharing

Small Stakes No Limit Hold 'Em by Ed Miller, Sunny Mehta, and Matt Flynn (2009)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdT1FNczMtbmFiSHc/view?usp=sharing

Theory of Poker (Fourth Edition) by David Sklansky (2004)https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8LYKVcwcHQdUk1CS3dYdGNDbTA/view?usp=sharing

 

ACP's note: Posting at the request of other players. Please keep in mind, reading books will not magically turn you into a good poker player. That mostly comes from experience. Rather, the purpose of reading books is to introduce you to concepts that you can apply to your games.

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+ACP+    33889

no harrington on holdem ill give you a 4/10

Added Volume I of Harrington on Hold 'Em, other volumes coming soon.

 

Edit: All volumes have been added

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super system is good too, most of sklanskys books are also solid.

for everyone that hates reading you can usually just make a 7 day trial on a coaching site like deucescracked and just download infinite videos but pretty sure nothing is going to give you the foundations of poker like these books.

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+ACP+    33889

super system is good too, most of sklanskys books are also solid.

for everyone that hates reading you can usually just make a 7 day trial on a coaching site like deucescracked and just download infinite videos but pretty sure nothing is going to give you the foundations of poker like these books.

You're talking about some books that were written over 20 years ago. A lot of that stuff doesn't apply to today's games. I would actively discourage newer players from reading those kinds of books, because they won't be able to sort through the relevant vs outdated material. I think taking a more straightforward approach and reading something from the last 5 years that specifically covers the games that you plan on playing is much better. The fundamentals will be covered in those books as well. For example, if you plan on playing full ring micros like myself, reading Splitsuit's book should be a top priority.

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+Digbick    7358

which one of these is good for starting on?

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+mmf+    23117
there are
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Whinesilencer    342

I also agree that Super System and books from that era aren't the way to go anymore. Heck, the game has changed a lot even since 2010, and a lot of old advice is exploitable and outdated and won't allow you to play optimal poker in 2016.

 

I've watched a decent amount of Pokerbank vids, and I usually like his content, so thanks for the resource!

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+ACP+    33889

which one of these is good for starting on?

For me personally, when I was introduced to poker I was sent Easy Game by Ryan Spicer. Honestly, I'm not sure if it's the best book for people with little to no existing poker knowledge though. I sent the book to a friend of mine who's been playing poker for a very months and a very smart guy (engineering graduate student) and he said that he had a lot difficulty completely understanding everything in the book.

 

I would try The Applications of No Limit Hold 'Em for a first poker book and let me know what you think about it. It is pretty recent book book and isn't outdated. The writing style is pretty professional and doesn't use a lot of shorthand or jargon. It's also pretty comprehensive at 500 pages.

 

Regardless of which book that you decide to read, there are two major concepts that any new poker player needs to have a very strong understanding of:

1. Poker is all about making plays that are positive expected value. There's no straightforward answer to how we do that, but one of the keys is that we play hands that have strong equity.

2. There are two reasons for making a bet or raise in poker. The first is for value. We want our opponent to put more money into the pot because we are the most likely to have the best hand at showdown. The second reason is to get our opponent to fold and pick up all of the money currently in the pot (aka a bluff).

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kidrock    234

I'm not a very active member as I don't really play yuigoh anymore (basically just post in sports forum) but I think it's awesome all the poker talk as of late.

 

I've actually got some material I like as well and will post it later today/tomorrow when I can access my word doc I keep things on.

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Jordan123    1547

For live poker most COTM articles on 2+2 are great reading. Here is the most recent one on price elasticity of demand in poker - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/cotm-price-inelasticity-demand-1570128/

 

 

This list of what people consider the best articles written for LLSNL are pretty great to - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/best-llsnl-1168186/

 

 

I've only heard great things about the book "Kill Everyone" based on tournament poker with strong modern theory and a push/fold chart - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/cotm-price-inelasticity-demand-1570128/

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+ACP+    33889

For live poker most COTM articles on 2+2 are great reading. Here is the most recent one on price elasticity of demand in poker - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/cotm-price-inelasticity-demand-1570128/

 

 

This list of what people consider the best articles written for LLSNL are pretty great to - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/best-llsnl-1168186/

 

 

I've only heard great things about the book "Kill Everyone" based on tournament poker with strong modern theory and a push/fold chart - http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/170/live-low-stakes-nl/cotm-price-inelasticity-demand-1570128/

Something that I've heard a number of coaches point out is the fact that 2+2 is a really inefficient way to learn anything about poker. The main reason being that true professionals don't post there. This is because they're spending all of their time playing poker, seeing as they don't make any money by getting into internet arguments (however they could get paid for their advice as a coach). In fact, the more posts per day someone has on 2+2, the larger likelihood that they are a losing or breakeven poker player. There are of course exceptions. But as I mentioned before, something that newer players want to avoid doing is trying to sort through garbage when you can't tell the different between garbage and good advice. 2+2 surprising reads a lot like yugioh theory and deck discussion posts, with a lot of psuedo-intellectual bullshit and a few rare diamonds in the rough. Again, I'm not saying that you can't learn anything on 2+2. Just that there are better ways to do so. As someone posted before, thepokerbank has some great youtube videos. Very concise, digestible, and not too overwhelming for newer players. If you can afford a good coach, that's of course another great way to learn poker. And of course the truly best way to play poker is to just start playing hands (for no money or small money at first).

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This is really nice! 
 
The "volumes" of Easy Game are just different editions of the same book, the third one being the latest and including everything from the previous two.
 
Applications of No Limit Hold Em is probably not a book you want to start out with or really read until you have some decent idea of what you're doing since it's abstract to a degree that even if you read it and understand the concepts you will almost certainly misapply them if you are just starting out, not to mention the style that it teaches (playing a game that approaches being unexploitable, to the limited extent that some GTO spots have been solved in NLHE) only starts being profitable at higher stakes online cash games and you would be extremely better off playing an exploitative strategy at any stake lower than that.
 
The Harrington on Hold 'Em books are probably outdated.
 
Don't Listen to Phil Hellmuth is pretty good but is the kind of book you want to read after having played a lot (this is probably true for any Poker reading) and having an idea of what you do in certain spots so you can contrast and think about what you do differently and why it may be suboptimal. The format is really nice, it presents a hand history and discusses what they take into consideration for the decision that was taken. This gives you the opportunity to look at the hand, do your own analysis and thinking, and then read the chapter and compare, so you get a lot out of it. I wish more Poker books made extensive use of this format since it promotes active reading. Don't take any one thing in this book too much to heart since a lot of the spots are very situational. Instead of thinking about it as a guide to what to do in X kind of spot, consider it a guide presenting a lot of examples about to HOW to think when you are in any spot, try to extrapolate principles out of the reasoning behind the decisions as opposed to getting caught up in any specific hand. It's an important skill to not get married to notions you may catch along the way like "in this spot, it is always correct to do X," since a lot of your money comes from knowing how to appropriately exploit others, which by definition requires deviation from GTO play, which your usual "correct" probably wasn't anyway.
 
The Mathematics of Poker is another book you might want to avoid for a while just like ANLHE. The math is provides is not the kind of thing you can get to use at a table right away, but rather the kind of thing you might use when studying your game off the table et cetera, basically there are better Poker resources to spend your time on other than this, specially when you are starting. 
 
Another thing to mention is that you're going to have to decide if you want to specialize in cash games or tournaments, at least when starting out, since the strategy for them is very different and very deep. There are moves that are correct when playing cash that are mistakes in tournaments and vice versa. Focusing on one will take you much farther than wasting time working on your cash or tournament game when you could be becoming even better at just one. You want to build on strength as opposed to trying to be decent at a bunch of Poker things, you want to be exceptional because that's how you make money in Poker.
 
Here are some books I can contribute:
 
Theory of Poker. Read this only to grasp the very basic concepts people use to discuss Poker theory in basically every other book. 
The Mental Game of Poker. Probably the most famous and recommended Poker book other than the one everyone has heard of. Focuses on everything that is essential to being a good Poker player other than technical play. Tilt management and so on.
Elements of Poker. My favorite book on Poker. Touches on everything that is needed to be a good Poker player, including technical aspects of playing but things surrounding that like table selection and so on. It's an easy read but there are a lot of really good insights in every section, so it's worth it to read a little a time and chew on it. If you are familiar with Evan Vargas' videos, the best I can describe this is if Evan was a Poker pro and instead of making videos he wrote this book, it has that laid back but also thorough and serious vibe to it. This book is better the more hands you have played, however.
Let There Be Range. Very efficient, straight and to the point book. Teaches basically all of the less obvious things you will usually hear about when people discuss Poker strategy (EV, range percentages, combinations, et cetera) and how to apply these at the table. 
 
There is no substitute for just grinding hands though. I'd recommend playing micro stakes rather than play money games since you WILL play different when playing badly will cost you money, even if it is $.02, trust me, and this is also true for the other players.
 
[The books are uploaded on filedropper and get deleted after 30 days, I'm hoping ACP downloads them and adds him to the Google Drive in the OP]
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+ACP+    33889

For some reason, of all the filedropper pages (with the exception of Theory of Poker) are missing a download link.

 

Honestly, tournaments require the exact same skills as cash games but require additional skills as well (better understanding of how stack sizes affect ranges as well as ICM). In other words, they are inherently more difficult than cash games, and hence I think it's best if newer players play strictly cash games (with the exception of freeroll tournament promotions that some sites have) at first. But yes, you're right that you need to read a book that applies to your game. That includes stakes as well. Don't read a book that caters to midstakes cash games if you play the micros.

 

Hopefully we can get some sort of study-group going, because I think people can learn a lot more from discussing their hands with a group of knowledgable players rather than trying to look over the contents of a book (which is static) to determine if they played a hand right.

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+ACP+    33889

Nevermind, I figured out how to download the books. You just have to remove the "showdownload.php/" part of the link. I'll upload and post the books tomorrow, as I'm going to bed soon. Also, if anyone has Blackrain79's book Crushing The Microstakes, I would much appreciate if someone could send it to me to add to my collection.

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+ACP+    33889

Wait where's the yugioh equivalent to these?

The only reason these books exist is because poker is a game that you can make million of dollars playing. That's the difference between poker and yugioh.

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+Logic    2035

@ACP, any suggestions on what material in the OP is most applicable to dining room table poker versus players that are somewhere between "I know enough about poker to get a game going at my house but id never play at a casino" and "don't know what I'm doing just watched it on TV for an hour and played at camp once?"

 

 

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+ACP+    33889
On 5/24/2016 at 6:41 AM, Logic said:

@ACP, any suggestions on what material in the OP is most applicable to dining room table poker versus players that are somewhere between "I know enough about poker to get a game going at my house but id never play at a casino" and "don't know what I'm doing just watched it on TV for an hour and played at camp once?"

 

 

Sorry it took awhile to respond. My internet was out for the past couple of days.

I actually have a new book to upload that's specifically geared towards beginning players. Check out Blackrain79's "Crushing the Microstakes." While it's not specifically about homegames, it's about how to beat the lowest quality of players that populate the online microstakes as well as the typical homegame.

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